Theatre, Globalization and the Cold War

We are pleased to announce the publication of the most recent volume in the series Transnational Theatre Histories (www.palgrave.com/it/series/14397) which explores the complex geopolitical and cultural imbrications of a globalising theatre culture against the backdrop of the Cold War.

 

The book examines how the Cold War had a far-reaching impact on theatre by presenting a range of current scholarship on the topic from scholars from a dozen countries. They represent in turn a variety of perspectives, methodologies and theatrical genres, including not only Bertolt Brecht, Jerzy Grotowski and Peter Brook, but also Polish folk-dancing, documentary theatre and opera production. The contributions demonstrate that there was much more at stake and a much larger investment of ideological and economic capital than a simple dichotomy between East versus West or socialism versus capitalism might suggest. Culture, and theatrical culture in particular with its high degree of representational power, was recognized as an important medium in the ideological struggles that characterize this epoch. Most importantly, the volume explores how theatre can be reconceptualized in terms of transnational or even global processes which, it will be argued, were an integral part of Cold War rivalries.

Table of contents (18 chapters)

  • Introduction

    Balme, Christopher B. (et al.)

    Pages 1-22

    A Cold War Battleground: Catfish Row versus the Nevsky Prospekt

    Canning, Charlotte M.

    Pages 25-43

  • Spirituals, Serfs, and Soviets: Paul Robeson and International Race Policy in the Soviet Union at the Start of the Cold War

    Silsby, Christopher

    Pages 45-57

  • The Politics of an International Reputation: The Berliner Ensemble as a GDR Theatre on Tour

    Barnett, David

    Pages 59-71

  • ‘A tour to the West could bring a lot of trouble…’—The Mazowsze State Folk Song and Dance Ensemble during the First Period of the Cold War

    Szymanski-Düll, Berenika

    Pages 73-85

  • Song and Dance Ensembles in Central European Militaries: The Spread, Transformation and Retreat of a Soviet Model

    Šmidrkal, Václav

    Pages 87-106

  • Theatre, Propaganda and the Cold War: Peter Brook’s Midsummer Night’s Dream in Eastern Europe (1972)

    Imre, Zoltán

    Pages 107-129

  • MI5 Surveillance of British Cold War Theatre

    Smith, James

    Pages 133-150

  • Creating an International Community during the Cold War

    Korsberg, Hanna

    Pages 151-163

  • The Cultural Cold War on the Home Front: The Political Role of Theatres in Communist Kraków and Leipzig

    Kunakhovich, Kyrill

    Pages 165-186

  • Years of Compromise and Political Servility—Kantor and Grotowski during the Cold War

    Michalak, Karolina Prykowska

    Pages 189-205

  • ‘A Memorable French-Romanian Evening’: Nationalism and the Cold War at the Theatre of Nations Festival

    Szeman, Ioana

    Pages 207-221

  • An Eastern Bloc Cultural Figure? Brecht’s Reception by Young Left-wingers in Greece in the 1970s

    Papadogiannis, Nikolaos

    Pages 223-238

  • Acting on the Cold War: Imperialist Strategies, Stanislavsky, and Brecht in German Actor Training after 1945

    Klöck, Anja

    Pages 239-257

  • Checkpoint Music Drama

    Stauss, Sebastian

    Pages 259-270

  • Whose Side Are You On? Cold War Trajectories in Eritrean Drama Practice, 1970s to Early 1990s

    Matzke, Christine

    Pages 273-292

  • ‘How close is Angola to us?’ Peter Weiss’s Play Song of the Lusitanian Bogeyman in the Shadow of the Cold War

    Hoogland, Rikard

    Pages 293-306

  • Manila and the World Dance Space: Nationalism and Globalization in Cold War Philippines and South East Asia

    yamomo, meLê (et al.)

    Pages 307-323

 https://www.palgrave.com/it/book/9783319480831#aboutBook

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.